Bach WTC Book I @ Spectrum

JOTTINGS


Blair McMillen is on the left; then Jed Distler; in front of Jed is the back of Lisa Moore's head?; then
Joan Forsyth; in front of Joan to the right is Sandra Sprecher.

July 28, 7PM

 

@ Spectrum

I am delighted to report of a lovely evening at Spectrum last night.  24 pianists were asked to perform a prelude & fugue from WTC Book I.

The performances were all terrific.   I was particularly pleased with Blair McMillen, who opened the show.  He prepared the piano with some kind of felt so that it sounded like a harpsichord with the lute stop. At first I though I was hearing the most amazing half-pedalling ever.  He removed the felt throughout the prelude, then went on to give a powerfully pianistic account of the fugue.  That is to say, it got bigger than it could have gotten on the harpsichord.  That's natural. I like it.

Playing these works on the piano is like a Leopold Stokowski orchestration, or, if you like, just a bit more grand than a performance on Wanda Landowska's souped-up harpsichord.

A few of the players attempted to tone that down, which was much appreciated, and yet, the piano is a piano, is a piano, which is to the harpsichord as Stokowski's huge Bach arrangements are to a little Baroque cantata ensemble.

I have to concede that Bach's lute music on the guitar almost always sounds like Spanish music. This is entirely to do with Romantic habits, in other words, bad habits.  However, in the hands of a properly re-programmed sensibility the guitar can sound very Baroque.  I'm not sure about the piano, and I don't care, but it is important to dispense with interpretive habits that come from later music.  

This was not a problem last night, however.  There was

The most daring performance was by Yegor George Shevtsov.  At the end of his C minor prelude he messed with the registers and we all were delighted with that; but what followed was the fugue with all the registered consistently screwed up.   Wonderful, sounded like Stravinsky.  Brilliantly played.

Joan Forsyth's performance of the E major was warm, her trills like caresses.  While her students at the Third Street Music School, as well as her husband and son, are quite aware that she can be a real......tough cookie....., her performance of this work is truly all loving kindness.

And particularly amazing is the C# minor prelude & fugue, which was played beautifully by Eleonor Sandresky.
Jessica Osborne played with great conviction & command.
Phyllis Chen played Bb at 100 miles/hour, with incredible spunk and fearlessness. 
Jed was the only one who improvised a cadenza, and it was quite spectacular.
Lisa Moore concuded with the monumental B minor, superbly controlled and paced.


And all the performers were a delight.  A cast of stand out characters, piano menschen, one and all.
If all these folks kept the same pieces in their fingers for a year they'd all do just as well or better than that guy who plays Bach on piano and gets reviews and big audiences.  Sir Andras something.

Thanks Glen Cornett, the evening's host, and Adam Tendler, who played brilliantly and organized the whole thing.  Mr. Tendler has a Tendancy to risk an action, to dare to make a splash, and I am certain we will see him do many important things soon and ongoing.

 

Blair McMillen has established himself as one of the most versatile and sought-after pianists today. The New York Times has described him as “riveting,” “prodigiously accomplished and exciting,” and as one of the piano’s “brilliant stars.” McMillen has performed in major venues both traditional and avant-garde: from Carnegie Hall, the Moscow Conservatory, Lincoln Center, Caramoor, Miller Theatre, and the Library of Congress; to (le) Poisson Rouge, Galapagos, and the Knitting Factory. Highlights from recent seasons include the Prokofiev Piano Concerto No. 1 at the Bard Music Festival, the Walter Piston Concertino for Piano in Carnegie Hall, and numerous appearances with the New York Philharmonic, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, and Albany Symphony. 2014 also saw McMillen’s debut at the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival, where he performed a solo recital featuring Morton Feldman’s Triadic Memories (a McMillen calling card; Alex Ross praised his “acute feeling for those remarkable passages…”) right on the heels of a sold-out performance with his tour de force piano sextet, Grand Band. Of his solo performance, the Kalamazoo Gazette wrote, “McMillen played with complete control, meticulously observing Feldman’s tempos, meters, and dynamics, making the high notes sing and the bass resonant…It was like watching the stars come out on a clear night by Lake Michigan, exquisitely played.“ Blair McMillen leads a multifarious musical life as pianist, chamber musician, conductor, and improviser. He thrives on playing a wide variety of musical styles: from medieval keyboard manuscripts to improvisation-based music of all types; from Classical/Romantic-era piano repertoire to the music of young 21st-century composers. Known for imaginative and daring programming, McMillen has premiered hundreds of new works both as a soloist and with numerous ensembles. He constantly collaborates with composers and artists of other genres in commissioning works that stretch the boundaries of the piano and the traditional recital format. McMillen is pianist for the Naumburg Award-winning Da Capo Chamber Players, the American Modern Ensemble, and the six-piano Grand Band, among others. He is the co-founder and co-director of the Rite of Summer Music Festival, an alt-classical outdoor concert series. Held on New York City’s Governors Island, Rite of Summer celebrated its fourth season in 2014 with eleven world premieres and concerts by Ethel, Iktus Percussion, Grand Band, and Dawn of Midi. Blair McMillen holds degrees from Oberlin College, the Juilliard School, and the Manhattan School of Music. He lives in New York City, and has served on the music faculty at Bard College and Conservatory since 2005. Pianist Yegor Shevtsov enjoys a multi-faceted career as a solo performer, chamber musician, recording artist, collaborator and educator. His performances have been singled out for their “Mozartean elegance” (The New York Times) and “superb musicianship” (The Miami Herald). His recent notable engagements have included appearances as a concerto soloist at Symphony Space (New York), Tokyo Bunka Kaikan (Japan), the National Theater in Taipei (Taiwan), and Auditorio de Ciudad de León (Spain).
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Yegor Shevtsov’s numerous solo recitals have included music spanning four hundred years of keyboard music, from Couperin, Rameau and Scarlatti to many composers of his generation. In the 2012-2013 season, Yegor Shevtsov has performed across the United States at Ojai Festival (California), Present Music Season Finale in Milwaukee (WI), Rockport Chamber Music Festival (MA), as well as ShapeShifter Lab, Roulette and Barbès (New York). Most recently, he recorded …avec un frisson, an album of late piano music of Debussy and Boulez, released on New Focus Recordings (FCR132). Yegor Shevtsov’s most significant artistic associations have been with Mark Morris, a world-renowned choreographer; Red Light New Music, a ground-breaking contemporary music collective; New World Symphony, America’s orchestral academy founded by Michael Tilson Thomas; American Ballet Theatre, one of the world’s premier ballet companies; Mischa Bouvier, an award-winning baritone; avant-garde composers Reiko Fueting, Yoav Gal, Andrew Noble and Scott Wollschleger. He has also appeared in concert with members of many renowned ensembles, such as the American String Quartet, Mivos Quartet, International Contemporary Ensemble, Bang on a Can, red fish blue fish, Alarm Will Sound, Argento Ensemble, Wet Ink Ensemble and Manhattan Sinfonietta, among others. Among the composers who have heard Yegor Shevtsov perform their works are Pierre Boulez, John Luther Adams, Elliott Carter, Charles Wuorinen, Steve Reich and George Crumb. Yegor Shevtsov’s principal piano teachers have been Nina Svetlanova, Sergey Edelman and Edna Golandsky. Yegor Shevtsov has been coached by some of the world’s finest musicians, such as Daniel Barenboim in his Beethoven Sonata Workshop at Carnegie Hall, Emmanuel Ax, Claude Franck, Garrick Ohlsson, James Levine, Ursula Oppens, Carol Wincenc, Martin Katz, Jeffrey Swann, Andre-Michel Schub, Craig Rutenberg, Dawn Upshaw, Christine Brewer and Yo-Yo Ma. Yegor Shevtsov was born in Lviv, Ukraine, where he began to play piano and dance competitively at an early age. After completing an Economics degree in Ukraine and the Netherlands as a George Soros International Scholar, he moved to New York, where he continued his musical training at the Manhattan School of Music and Tanglewood Music Center. He earned a Doctor of Musical Arts degree with his dissertation on unpublished song orchestrations of Maurice Ravel, which he presents at international musicological conferences. Yegor Shevtsov is on the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music and the MSM Precollege Division. He currently studies flamenco in the studio of Soledad Barrio.
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Michael J. Shumacher studied piano since the age of five and as a teen, taught himself the guitar, forming a number of improvising bands while in high school. He began composing at an early age and studied at Indiana University School of Music in Bloomington, where he majored in composition. In 1982, he won a prize for his composition skills. He also studied piano with the renowned interpreter John Ogden and enrolled at theJuilliard school where he earned the doctorate degree in 1988. On the path to becoming a serious classical composer, interests in rock, experimental music, and improvisation led him to the New York avant-garde music scene and in 1991, he began to work with minimalist composer La Monte Young. He began collaboration with fellow minimalists – the acclaimed cellist Charles Curtis and guitarist Donald Miller of Borbetomagus – and the three are collectively the Donald Miller Trio. Schumacher has composed for all manner of instruments and styles, including two symphonies, two song cycles, and numerous works for solo piano in the minimalist/avant-garde, rock, and ambient styles. His work with electronics, specializing in computer generated sound and processing of acoustic instruments is similar to the methods used by Brian Eno in his ambient works; he uses many instruments including prepared electric guitar, piano, and lap-top computer. Many of his pieces are presented as "sound installations,” a style between composition and sculpture which history stems from the pioneering experimental works of Max Neuhaus and David Tudor. In the ‘90s he produced music by David First, Ben Manley, Matt Rogalsky, David Berhman, Tom Hamilton, Ron Kuivila, Phill Niblock, Lee Ranaldo, Dean Roberts, and Steve Roden in his New York music gallery Studio 5 Beekman Street. His drone-based guitar work is documented on Fidicin Drones, a CD of improvisations in which he used bows to produce symphonic drones from an electric guitar.
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Eleonor Sandresky’s music, described as beautiful, liberating, witty, and as having ever-varying qualities of touch, register and intensity by The New York Times, among others, encompasses the acoustic, the electronic and the multi-media, including music for virtuoso soloists and large ensembles, cabaret, art songs, and evening-length collaborations. Her music has been featured in film at Cannes, among other festivals, and can be heard on Koch International, One Soul Records, ERM Media’s Masterworks of the New Era series, and Albany Records. A MacDowell Colony fellow, her music has been heard on three continents, from the Composers Concordance Festivals to the Totally Huge New Music Festival in Perth, Australia. She has received grants and commissions from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, NYSCA, Jerome Foundation, ASCAP, American Music Center, and Meet the Composer. In the last year, Ms. Sandresky has collaborated with an impressive list of composer performers, including Kevin Norton, Pat Irwin, Kamala Sankaram and Jim Pugliese in her concert series at Spectrum in NYC, Rétes, creating new compositions with different composer/performers for each concert. She has also completed a 92 minute film score for Wunderkammern: The Private Life of Objects, with LA filmmaker, Erika Suderburg, a tribute to Terry Riley’s In C, entitled In Short Db, and will complete a commissioned work for Parthenia viol consort, to be premiered on March 22, 2015. Working at the forefront of avant-garde concert-as-theater, she reinvented herself as a Choreographic Pianist with her evening-length composition, A Sleeper’s Notebook, premiered at the Kitchen in 2003. In it she explores her deep interest in how motion translates to emotion through sound, a hyper-emotional experience for the audience and the performer. Ms. Sandresky’s latest pieces, created for herself as well as other performers, build on these concepts. Her latest commission, from NYSCA, is for a new work for Parthenia choreographed. Please visit www.esandresky.com for more information and to listen and watch.
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Japanese pianist, Mayuko Yamashita holds a Master of Performance in Contemporary Piano (MPerf) from the Royal College of Music, London and is currently studying an Advanced Certificate in Music Education at NYU Steinhardt under the direction of Marilyn Nonken. During her time at the Royal College of Music she was awarded the John and Jean Redcliffe Maud prize. Mayuko has performed extensively both nationally and internationally, including Finland, Spain, Australia, USA and the UK. As soloist and chamber musician, she has appeared at a number of international festivals. In 2012 she was invited to play at the BBC Proms series where her performance was broadcast on BBC Radio3. In 2014, she performed with Principal-oboist of the Orchetre de l´Opéra de Paris, Jacques Tys at the IDRS festival. She currently works as an Adjunct Piano Instructor at NYU and as a ballet pianist at Joffrey Ballet School in NYC.
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A captivating presence both on and offstage, critically acclaimed American pianist Lara Downes is recognized as one of the most exciting and communicative classical artists of her generation. Called “a delightful artist with a unique blend of musicianship and showmanship” by NPR, praised by the Washington Post for the “drama and nuance” of her playing, and by the New York Times for her “loving attention to mood and color”, Downes presents the piano repertoire - from iconic favorites to newly commissioned works - in new ways that bridge musical tastes, genres and audiences. Since making concert debuts at Queen Elizabeth Hall London, the Vienna Konzerthaus and the Salle Gaveau Paris, Downes has won over audiences on the world’s most prestigious stages, including Carnegie Hall, Kennedy Center, and Lincoln Center. Recital and festival appearances include the American Academy Rome, San Francisco Performances, the Montreal Chamber Music Festival, Costa Rica International Chamber Music Festival, Portland Piano International and the University of Washington World Series, among many others. Her original solo performance projects have received support from prominent organizations such as the National Endowment for the Arts, the Barlow Endowment, California Presenters, the Center for Cultural Innovation and American Public Media. Ms. Downes’ chamber music appearances include collaborations with noted soloists and ensembles including cellist Zuill Bailey, violinist Rachel Barton Pine, and the Alexander String Quartet. Commissions and premieres of new works for Lara have come from composers Mohammed Fairouz, David Sanford, Benny Golson, and Eve Beglarian, among others, and she has enjoyed cross-genre collaborations with the likes of former US Poet Laureate Rita Dove. Downes’ solo recordings have met with tremendous critical and popular acclaim. Her debut CD Invitation to the Dance was called “magical” by NPR, and her second release American Ballads was ranked by Amazon among the best recordings of American concert music ever made. Dream of Me was praised for “exquisite sensitivity” by American Record Guide. 13 Ways of Looking at the Goldberg was called “addicting” by the Huffington Post, and “magnificent and different” by Sequenza 21. Exiles’ Café (2013) was featured by radio stations from WQXR New York to KDFC San Francisco, was called “ravishing” by Fanfare Magazine. She is regularly heard nationwide on Sirius XM Symphony Hall and nationally syndicated radio programs including NPR Performance Today, WNYC New Sounds, WFMT Impromptu, TPR Classical Spotlight and WWFM Cadenza. Lara’s busy performance career is strongly driven by her commitment to expanding and developing new audiences for the arts. She is the Founder and President of the 88 KEYS® Foundation, a non-profit organization that fosters opportunities for music experiences and learning in America’s public schools, and she regularly works and performs with the next generation of talented young musicians as Artistic Director of the National Young Artists program at the Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, UC Davis, where she serves as Artist in Residence. Lara is Founder and Director of The Artist Sessions. Lara Downes is a Steinway Artist.
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Nicholas Pavkovic received an A.B. from the University of Chicago in mathematics and an M.M. in composition from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where he studied with Elinor Armer. His 2011 composition, Angelus Novus, received the school’s James Highsmith Award for orchestral composition. A prolific composer for film, Pavkovic has scored more than two dozen narrative features and shorts, and was named a Sundance Composers Lab fellow in 2008. In the same year he received the grand prize in the Percussive Arts Society composition competition for Concertino for Piano and Percussion.He is active in the planning and administration of the San Francisco Conservatory’s annual Hot Air Music Festival, which hosted the premiere of his chamber opera, Sredni Vashtar, in 2010. In 2011, SFCM alumnus and pianist Robin Sutherland premiered Pavkovic’s Rhapsody for Viola and Piano with San Francisco Symphony violist Jonathan Vinocour. Sutherland subsequently commissioned Volante, a three-movement suite for clarinet and piano. Mr. Pavkovic is General Manager of the concert series Curious Flights and Executive Director of the Ross McKee Foundation for the Musical Arts. He is a professor of musicianship and music theory at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music.
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Melinda Faylor, a native of Queens, New York, began piano at the age of four at the School for Strings in NY. She received her BM from the Oberlin Conservatory in the studio of Robert Shannon, where she was the recipient of the Dean’s Talent Award. She received her MM in piano performance at the Manhattan School of Music, with help from a Masonic scholarship, in the studio of Dr Arkady Aronov. Ms Faylor has experience as anaccompanist, chamber musician, orchestral pianist and solo pianist. She has also studied with John Nauman and Elyane Laussade. Summer festivals include the Mannes College of Music IFCP and IKIF Festivals, as well as the Orford, Las Vegas, Tibor Vargas, and Ecole Normale de Musique festivals. She has worked extensively with electronic music and has performed with electronics as part of the SEAMUS and OCEAN festivals, the NYC International Fringe Festival, the University of North Carolina in Greensboro, Hofstra University, the Great Hall at Cooper Union, and at the University of Akron in Ohio. Her passion for contemporary music led her to join Oberlin’s CME (2000-2001) and the New York based TACTUS and Delancey ensembles (2003-2006) as well. As a composer, Melinda’s song cycle Jouyssance Vous Donneray was premiered at the international Luce Irigaray conference at Hofstra University by gifted soprano Tiffany Dumouchelle. From 2007-2009 Melinda was a founding member of Dames en Feu, a multimedia electronic cabaret/fire dancing ensemble for whom she also composed electronic and instrumental music. In 2009-2010 she travelled throughout Australia and South East Asia, studying Gamelan in Bali, performing with violinist Michelle Cassumbhoy at St. John’s Southgate in Melbourne, and performing solo piano on 3MBS Classical Radio in Melbourne. She also organized a fire dancing cabaret in Sydney, played a production of RENT the musical and earned her scuba diving certification. Melinda is also a member of Cultures in Harmony, a NY based NPO that brings classical music to developing countries and encourages cultural dialogue across boundaries through the use of music. With CIH she travelled to the Philippines in 2009 where she gave master classes, taught private lessons, helped organize a production at the Cultural Center of the Philippines, gave an interview on the 98.7 DZFE classical radio station and performed chamber and solo music. In 2010-2011 Melinda has subbed with the Lunatics at Large and Mimesis Ensembles, and has performed on composition concerts at Queens College and NYU. She is currently freelancing, teaching privately, collaborating with modern dancer Loren Groenendaal, is pianist and organist at the Lutheran Church of Our Savior in Mineola, LI, and is the director of the Arete Ensemble, a contemporary chamber music group (2006-present).
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Canadian pianist Joan Forsyth is a multi-faceted musician who has received critical acclaim as a soloist and chamber music artist. She has been heard throughout Europe, Japan, South and North America in a wide range of repertoire, embracing the standard piano literature as well as the most recent works. Her prize-winning performances in the 1990 Concerts Atlantique and La Gesse competitions set in motion tours of France and Switzerland, and since that time she has maintained a lively concert schedule. She has collaborated with such ensembles as the Cassatt Quartet, the Theater Chamber Players of the Kennedy Center and CYGNUS, and appeared as soloist with the Westchester Philharmonic and the Westchester Chamber Orchestra. She toured the Netherlands and Scandinavia with CYGNUS and a program of new American music in 1997 and then travelled with theat ensemble again to Russia in 1998. She performed in Tokyo with Trio Spark! in 2006. Her performances have been broadcast over WNYC, WFAS, Vermont and New York Public Radio, RAI Italy, Radio Denmark and Polish National Radio. An active performer, Dr. Forsyth is both a sympathetic chamber musician and commanding soloist. She has made appearances at such venues as the Kennedy Center, Merkin Hall, Zankel and Weil Recital Halls, as well as tours of Europe, Russia, Japan and South America. Her playing has been broadcast on WNYC, WFAS, RAI(Italy), Vermont Public Radio, and New York Public Radio. She has appeared as soloist with the Westchester Chamber Orchestra and the Westchester Philharmonic. Joan Forsyth has recorded for CRI, Albany, Bridge, Soundspells and Furious Artisans. Ms. Forsyth also makes recital appearances with duo-partner guitarist William Anderson, most recently an Italian tour and a concert dedicated to the Segovia repertoire at Carnegie Recital hall in 2007. The two premiered and recorded Charles Wuorinen’s Sonata for Piano and Guitar the works of composer Meyer Kupferman on the Soundspells label. In 1992 Ms. Forsyth’s interest in new American music led her to form the Stein Hall Players, an ensemble devoted to contemporary music. The group produced the American Mosaic series in Westchester throughout the 90s, featuring celebrated guest artists and the premieres of many new works. Members of that group went on to form the Cerwydden Trio, a flute, cello and piano trio that has played to great acclaim in festivals and chamber music venues on the East Coast. The Cerwydden Trio performs repertoire that spans a time period from the Renaissance to the twenty-first century, combining Ms. Forsyth’s many musical loves. Teaching has always been an important part of her musical life, and she maintains a vibrant piano studio in Mount Vernon, New York. Dr. Forsyth holds a Doctorate of Musical Arts degree from Rutgers University and a Master’s degree from the Juilliard School of Music. She has over thirty years of teaching experience, having taught both privately and for such institutions as New York University, Concordia College and Sarah Lawrence College. She also has Suzuki piano training, assisted Dr. Shinichi Suzuki and Mme. H. Katoka at Suzuki Institute West in San Francisco and takes a special interest in early childhood education. Joan Forsyth is the Chairman and founder of the Bronxville center of the National Guild of Piano teachers and a past Chairman of the Westchester-Rockland –Putnam Music Teachers Association. Currently she is the Chairperson of the Piano Department at Third Street Music School in New York City.
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Hailed by the Washington Post as a pianist “with a refreshing mellowness and poetic touch” after her debut with the National Symphony Orchestra, Jessica Xylina Osborne is one of the most intensely expressive, passionate artists of her generation. She has performed widely in the United States and Europe, including performances in such venues as Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Kennedy Center’s Terrace Theater and Concert Hall, and Merkin Hall. Radio broadcasts include NPR’s Performance Today, WQXR in New York, WGMS in Washington D.C., and KUHF in Houston. Jessica Osborne has collaborated with some of the world’s most distinguished performing musicians, including Miriam Fried and Felicia Moye, and with such rising stars as Benjamin Beilman, Paul Huang, and Yura Lee. As a founding member of Trio Dumka, Ms. Osborne has toured Western Europe, including performances in Venasque, Chateauneuf-du-Pape and Barcelona. An active proponent of new music, Jessica Osborne is a frequent collaborator with composers including Martin Bresnick and Christopher Theofanidis, and has premiered works by Matthew Barnson, Ted Hearne, and Hannah Lash. She recently performed with members of Opera Moderne at the Galapagos Art Space in Brooklyn, receiving praise from the New York Times, and is a frequent collaborator in the renowned New Music New Haven series. A winner of numerous piano competitions, Jessica Osborne has received international recognition with top awards in the International Bartok-Kabalevsky-Prokofiev Competition, International Russian Music Piano Competition, and the Ima Hogg Young Artists’ Competition. Jessica Osborne completed her doctoral studies in piano performance at Yale University, where she studied with Claude Frank. She received her Master of Music degree at Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music under the tutelage of Jon Kimura Parker. She received her undergraduate degree from Indiana University and the Juilliard School. Previous teachers include Emile Naoumoff, Seymour Lipkin, Martin Canin, Marjorie Lee, and Patricia Osborne.
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Hailed by Village Voice critic Kyle Gann as one of “new music’s most valued performers,” Joseph Kubera has been recognized as a leading interpreter of contemporary music for the past 30 years. He has been soloist at such festivals as the Berlin Inventionen, the Warsaw Autumn and Prague Spring, Miami’s Subtropics Festival and Berkeley’s Edgefest. He has been pianist in residence at the Ostrava Days New Music Festival since its inception in 2001. Mr. Kubera has been awarded grants through the NEA Solo Recitalist Program and the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, and was a Creative Associate with the Center for the Creative and Performing Arts at SUNY Buffalo in its heyday. Mr. Kubera has had a long and committed relationship to John Cage and his music since the early 1970s. One of the few pianists performing the difficult chance-based, post-1950 works, he has recorded the complete Music of Changes and the Concert for Piano and Orchestra, and has toured with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company at Cage’s invitation. In recent years, he has championed the music of his late Buffalo compatriot, Julius Eastman, reviving little-known piano works and directing performances of his multiple-piano pieces. Most recently, he has toured the remarkable new hour-long piano work Dreamers of Pearl by Michael Byron. Other composers who have written for Mr. Kubera include Larry Austin, Anthony Coleman, David First, Alvin Lucier, Roscoe Mitchell, Howard Riley, and “Blue” Gene Tyranny, among others. Mr. Kubera is a core member of S.E.M. Ensemble and Orchestra, and the Downtown Ensemble, and he has performed with a broad range of New York groups from the Brooklyn Philharmonic to the New York New Music Ensemble to Steve Reich and Musicians. He tours frequently with baritone Thomas Buckner, and luminaries such as Terry Riley and Ingram Marshall have written for his duo-piano team with Sarah Cahill. He has worked closely with such composers as Alvin Lucier, Robert Ashley, Morton Feldman and La Monte Young. In addition to the Cage above, solo recordings include Beth Anderson’s Piano Concerto on New World, Lucier’s Still Lives on Lovely Music, Cowell’s Nine Ings on New Albion, and Michael Sahl’s Serenades on Albany. He has also recorded for the Wergo, O.O. Discs, 1750 Arch, Mutable Music, Cold Blue, and Opus One labels.
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Nurit Tilles has been described by the Village Voice as “one of new music’s most valuable pianists.” She has performed with Steve Reich & Musicians since 1975, was a member of The Mother Mallard Band, and has enjoyed a long association with Meredith Monk. Nurit’s recordings of modern piano rags was produced by Rudi Blesh. Her own pieces include Raw Silk (A Rag) and The Kitchen Table. Lately she has been performing with Brenda Cummings as the vaudeville team, North and Stepinski.
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Cheryl Seltzer has had a life-long devotion to both traditional and new music.  While still a student at California’s Mills College, she performed Mozart concerti with three professional Bay Area orchestras, including the San Francisco Symphony.  Her studies with Mills composers Darius Milhaud, Leon Kirchner, and Lawrence Moss inspired her long career performing and promoting new music.  While a graduate student at Columbia U., in 1966 she co-founded the organization eventually known as Continuum, which for 45 years presented an annual New York series of composers’ retrospectives devoted to the giants of 20th-century music from a global perspective. Continuum won acclaim for introducing here unknown “underground” composers from the former USSR such as Schnittke, Gubaidulina, Pärt, Silvestrov, Ustvolskaya . Ms. Seltzer has toured widely with Continuum, including six visits to Mongolia, and recorded extensively, including nine CDs on Naxos of American pioneer composers.  This season, as an officer of the Stefan Wolpe Society, she organized and performed in three Wolpe concerts.
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The performances of Marcus Ostermiller, lauded as a “contemporary music champion,” have been described as “virtuosic” and “compelling” (Broadway World). Recently, he has appeared at Hamilton Recital Hall (Denver), the Great Hall at Cooper Union (New York), the Nels-Atkins Museum (Kansas City), and Spectrum (New York). Mr. Ostermiller made his solo debut at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall in 2011. Mr. Ostermiller holds a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Denver’s Lamont School of Music, where he studied with Alice Rybak, graduating summa cum laude in 2009. Awarded the Jack Kent Cooke Graduate Scholarship to support his graduate studies at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, Mr. Ostermiller completed the Master of Music degree in 2011 and the Ph.D. in Music Performance in 2015. While at NYU, he studied piano with Deirdre O’Donohue and Anthony de Mare, and wrote a doctoral dissertation, Musical Responses to AIDS: Meaning and Signification in Two Works for Solo Piano by Robert Savage and Kevin Oldham. An advocate for HIV/AIDS treatment and awareness, Mr. Ostermiller has produced, hosted, and performed in benefits for organizations such as the Gay Men’s Health Crisis, New York AIDS Walk, Colorado AIDS Project, Regional AIDS Interfaith Network, Bailey House, and the Joshua Gomes Memorial Scholarship Fund. Also a music educator, he has taught private and group piano lessons to students of all ages. From 2007-2008, he served as Vice President of the Denver chapter of the Music Teachers’ National Association and, from 2009 to 2011, he worked as an adjunct instructor in the Department of Music and Performing Arts Professions at NYU Steinhardt. Mr. Ostermiller is now a piano instructor at the British International School of New York.
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Pianist Cristina Altamura authentically embraces an older European sensibility while still capturing the spirit of a contemporary, multi-ethnic world.  Her pianism has been described as “rich in abandon and emotional surprises,” (Amici della Musica, Bologna) with a “power that was astonishing” (La Presse, Montreal). As a teen, Ms. Altamura made her Carnegie Hall solo orchestral debut with George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue.  Her European debut took place with the Bucharest Philharmonic under the baton of Karel Mark Chichon at the Ateneul Roman. This was followed by an invitation to be principal soloist of the State Philharmonic of Bacau, a position she held from 1999-2002.  Her close musical association with Romania resulted in performances and recordings with all of the major Romanian orchestras, as well as other European orchestras. This period of work focusing on the vast piano concerto repertoire culminated in 2003, when Ms. Altamura was presented at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall in two piano concerti: Mozart K. 488 and Beethoven’s First. Cristina Altamura’s artistry stems from a deep connection to her Italian-born parents.  Her mother – who studied voice during opera’s golden era with Maria Callas’ teacher and at the Verdi Conservatory in Milan with Pavarotti’s teacher – has had a profound influence on her bel canto-informed Chopin interpretations. From 1995-2002, Cristina studied in Italy, first with Marcelo Abbado and then with Maestro Franco Scala, director of the famed Accademia Pianistica d’Imola. In 1997, Ms. Altamura was the only American musician awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to Italy. That same year, she was awarded a scholarship from the National Italian American Foundation in Washington, D.C. and a subsequent Alitalia Airlines grant for touring. Cristina has been a frequent guest on New York’s WQXR, where her winning, uncut Fulbright audition tape was broadcast on WQXR’s McGraw-Hill Young Artists Showcase. In 2001 WQXR host Robert Sherman presented Cristina as soloist with the State Philharmonic of Romania “Bacau” to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Planting Fields Oyster Bay Beethoven Festival where she played Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No.1.  Other live radio appearances have included a recital on the Myra Hess concert series for Chicago’s WFMT. Ms. Altamura’s taste, reflected in her multi-disciplined and multi-cultured background, also extends to Latin America.  In 2004, she caught the attention of Guido López-Gavilán, the composer and principal conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra of Cuba, who invited her to present a solo recital in Havana at the historic Basilica de San Fransisco.  The concert was subsequently broadcast throughout South America.  She has collaborated with Colombian-born composer and master conguero Samuel Torres on a program of new works from Latin America and the Caribbean. The pianist’s background also includes ballet training with former Ballet-Russes and NYCB dancers, and at the Joffrey Ballet School. In 2007, Cristina conceived a project fusing the music of J.S. Bach with cutting-edge breakdance with Rokafella, world-renowned pioneer female breakdancer and choreographer.  Their debut together took place at the Amelia Island Chamber Music Festival, and they performed for a thousand-plus audience at Central Park Summer Stage. Their collaborative work eventually matured in the multi-disciplinary performance piece Outside the Bachx, a work co-commissioned by the Kennedy Center and New Victory Theater fusing classical piano, DJ, beatboxing while juxtaposing classical ballet with urban dance styles. They presented it at the Kennedy Center in February 2015 during a two week residency. In the near future, Cristina plans to explore the idea of keyboard virtuosity across a vast span of time, from the Frescobaldi of her Italian heritage, to the standard repertoire of Bach and Chopin, to contemporary experiments of Ligeti and Dan Trueman’s new etudes for the “Prepared Digital Piano.” Cristina is currently finishing a masters degree at Rutgers University, having received her Bachelors at The Mannes College of Music.  She lives in the New York City area with her husband Adam Sliwinski and ten-year old son Guillermo.
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Emily Manzo is a pianist, songwriter and vocalist that Time Out New York considers “a uniquely protean artist who makes several scenes move.” The New York Times has described her “attention to detail exceptional.“ Emily has performed throughout the U.S. and Europe in concerts and festivals of chamber music, experimental music and rock music. As a vocalist and pianist she has premiered the works of many American composers. Her degrees were earned at the New England Conservatory, the Oberlin Conservatory of Music and Columbia University where her teachers included Stephen Drury and Lydia Frumkin. Emily currently resides in New York where she performs regularly as a classical solo and chamber musician, as well as with her pop group, Christy & Emily. She can be heard as vocalist and pianist on Tzadik, SHSK’H, The Social Registry, Big Print (UK), Klangbad (DE), Merge, and Jagjaguar. With funding from the Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Foundation, Emily completed her recording of the complete Chopin Preludes at Merkin Concert Hall in November 2012.
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Praised by The New York Times for his “muscularly virtuosic, remarkably uninhibited performance [and] impressive talents”, Anthony de Mare is recognized as one of the world’s most versatile pianists, a foremost champion of contemporary music, and a pioneer in the speaking-singing pianist genre. De Mare is currently touring Liaisons: Re-Imagining Sondheim from the Piano, his latest initiative, a landmark commissioning and concert project that perfectly expresses his vision to expand both the repertoire and the audience for contemporary music. As creator, performer and co-producer of The Liaisons Project, he has brought together 36 of today’s most highly regarded emerging and established composers spanning the classical contemporary, jazz, film, theater and indie worlds to bring the work of Stephen Sondheim into the concert hall.  From Steve Reich to William Bolcom, Nico Muhly to Mark Anthony Turnage, the 2013-14 season will see the addition of the final four new works by Wynton Marsalis, Duncan Sheik, Andy Akiho and Jherek Bischoff to complete the project. Sold-out houses and raves in The New York Times greeted the first two New York premieres of The Liaisons Project at Symphony Space in 2012 and 2013. Recent performances have included The Ravinia Festival, the Gilmore Keyboard Festival, the Virginia Arts Festival, Monadnock Music Festival, the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, the Portland Piano International Festival, the Cliburn Series in Fort Worth and Music at Meyer in San Francisco. The 2013-14 season will feature performances at the Schubert Club in Minneapolis, the Mondavi Center at UC Davis and Yoshi’s Jazz Club in San Francisco, among others. Among his best known performance projects are Playing With MySelf, a multi-media concert event; Missing Peace, an eclectic series of old and new works inspired by the exhibition The Missing Peace: Artists Consider the Dalai Lama; the national tour of The American Piano (with pianist Steven Mayer); Cool ~ A Journey into the Influence of Jazz; and Unities: Music of Pride and Celebration.  De Mare has also collaborated and performed with the Lark Quartet, the Bang-On-A-Can All Stars, Meredith Monk/The House, and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, among many others.  He has been profiled by the Chicago Tribune, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Time Out NY, The Contrapuntist, BroadwayWorld.com, among others, and has been heard in performance and interviews on nationally syndicated shows with WNYC’s John Schaefer, NPR, WQXR and numerous stations across the country. Having been awarded First Prize and Audience Prize at the International Gaudeamus Interpreters Competition (The Netherlands) and The International Competition of Contemporary Piano Music (France), de Mare debuted under the auspices of Young Concert Artists and gave his Carnegie Hall debut at Zankel Hall. Mr. de Mare has nearly twenty recordings in his discography. His most recent recording, SPEAK! ~ The Speaking-Singing Pianist, the first disc devoted completely to this genre, was released in 2010 on the Innova label.  Both SPEAK! and Out of My Hands (KOCH Entertainment) were short listed for Grammy Awards in 2011 and 2005 respectively. He currently serves on the roster of Yamaha Artists and is a professor of piano at Manhattan School of Music and New York University.
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Adam Tendler has been called "an exuberantly expressive pianist” who “vividly displayed his enthusiasm for every phrase” by The Los Angeles Times, an “intrepid…outstanding…maverick pianist” by The New Yorker, a “modern-music evangelist” by Time Out New York, and a pianist who “has managed to get behind and underneath the notes, living inside the music and making poetic sense of it all,” by The Baltimore Sun, who continued, “if they gave medals for musical bravery, dexterity and perseverance, Adam Tendler would earn them all.” A graduate of Indiana University, Tendler has performed solo recitals in all fifty United States, including engagements at Columbia University, Bard College, Princeton University, New York University, Kenyon College, Boston Conservatory, San Francisco Conservatory, Portland State University (Oregon), University of Nebraska, University of Alaska and Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music, as well as artistic landmarks including Houston’s Rothko Chapel and James Turrell’s Skypace in Sarasota, where he was the space’s first musical performer. Tendler’s memoir, 88x50, about his landmark fifty-state tour, was a 2014 Kirkus Indie Book of the Month and Lambda Literary Award Nominee. His premiere recording of Edward T. Cone’s 21 Little Preludes will appear in 2015, and he is developing an album of piano works by American composer, Robert Palmer. Tendler also maintains the blog, The Dissonant States, and has been heard on Pacifica and NPR stations nationwide and a performer and programmer. He presides over a private teaching studio in New York City, and in 2013 joined the piano faculty of Third Street Music School Settlement, the country’s first community music school.
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Critically acclaimed pianist Taka Kigawa has earned outstanding international recognition as a recitalist, soloist, and chamber music artist since winning First Prize in the prestigious 1990 Japan Music Foundation Piano Competition in Tokyo, and the Diploma Prize at the 1998 Concurs Internacional Maria Canals De Barcelona in Spain, with such accolades from The New York Times as “Phenomenon. There’s no denying that he is something special,” “The extraordinary pianist.” and from The New Yorker “Unbelievably challenging program. Kigawa is an artist of stature.” and from La Nación (Buenos Aires) “Taka Kigawa is a stupendous virtuoso.” His New York City recital in 2010 was chosen as one of the best concerts of the year by The New York Times. His New York City recital in August 2011 was picked as one of the most notable concerts in the 2011-2012 season by Musical America. Also his Buenos Aires recital in April 2014 was chosen as one of the best concerts of the year by Argentina’s leading paper, La Nación. He has performed extensively as a recitalist and soloist in New York, Washington DC, Boston, Cleveland, Paris, Milan and Barcelona, with appearances in Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, Kosciuszko Foundation, Severance Hall in Cleveland, Cité de la Musique, and Salle Gaveau in Paris, Plau de la Música Catalana in Barcelona, and Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires. He frequently tours in his native Japan, appearing in Tokyo, Osaka, Nagano and Kyoto, both as a recitalist and a soloist with orchestra and in chamber music groups. He has performed with such distinguished institution as The Cleveland Orchestra. He has been a featured artist on many television and radio networks throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia. His repertoire is extremely large and varied, ranging from the baroque to avant-garde compositions of today. He has collaborated closely with such renowned musicians as Pierre Boulez, Myung-Whun Chung and Jonathan Nott. Also he premiered the last solo piano piece of Yusef Lateef, the jazz legend, in New York City in 2013. Mr. Kigawa grew up in Nagano, Japan, where he began piano studies at the age of three, winning his first competition at the age of seven. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Shinsyu University, and his Master of Arts degree from Tokyo Gakugei (Liberal Arts) University, graduating with honors in Piano Performance. During both his undergraduate and graduate years, he also studied composition and conducting, receiving high honors in both disciplines. He furthered his studies in the United States at The Juilliard School in New York, where he earned his Master of Music degree. Mr. Kigawa currently lives in New York City, U.S.A.
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Sandra Sprecher is the Artistic Director of The Firehouse Space in Brooklyn and Owner and Curator of DENSITY 21.5.  She is also a Sound Design for theater and film productions, and a freelance music copying and post production film editing.  She does extensive solo and ensemble performance including the traditional classical  repertoire with and a strong  concentration on  the music of the 20th Century. She holds a DMA in Composition from Columbia University, an M.M. Composition, with distinction from Indiana University, a Diplome Superieur in Piano, with unanimous decision from the jury from the Ecole Normale de Musique, Paris, and a B.A. Piano and Composition, summa cum laude from Washington University.
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Phyllis Chen is a pianist, toy pianist and composer who’s musical interests have led in numerous directions as a soloist and collaborative artist. Described as “a dazzling performer who wrings novel sounds from the humble toy piano,”(NY Times) and “a bold pianist with an excellent sense of color” (LA Times), Phyllis has performed in a large variety of contexts in the US and abroad. As a composer, her music has been described as “spellbinding” (NY Times) and “mesmerizing” (Chicago Reader), focusing on the use of toy pianos and miniature objects/instruments to distill and express the many (bigger/smaller) things in life. Phyllis started playing the piano at the age of five and came across the toy piano as an adult. Immediately she fell in love with it and felt a need to explore its possibilities.  In 2007, Phyllis started the UnCaged Toy Piano to encourage composers to write new music for the instrument.  Since its inception, the call has received over 200  toy piano pieces from around the globe. In 2011, Phyllis launched the first Bienniel UnCaged Toy Piano Festival, a three day  extravaganza featuring new works for toy piano and a roster of performers. The festival  was greeted with enthusiasm, inspiring audience members to cross state borders and oceans to attend. The 2015 festival programming is underway. (Please check the UnCaged Toy Piano website for more details.) Spending so much time with the instrument, Phyllis naturally started composing, often using it in collaboration with her partner and video artist, Rob Dietz, to create miniature theatrical works such as The Memoirist, The Slumber Thief and Down The Rabbit-Hole. Her pieces gradually gained the attention of others, leading to commissions by  ensembles and organizations such as the ICElab Series, the Boston-based string ensemble A Far Cry, Baryshnikov Center, Mt. Holyoke Choir, Opera Cabal and the Roulette-Jerome Commission. She has received grants from New Music USA, Foundation for the Contemporary Arts, NYSCA (via Concert Artists Guild and Look & Listen Festival) and Fromm Foundation.  She is currently working on a new work for Margaret Leng Tan commissioned by the Singapore International Festival of the Arts and a chamber work for string quartet and toy piano for Jack Quartet, scheduled to be premiered at the Look & Listen Festival in May 2016.  She is  one of the composers for the one-woman play, The Other Mozart about Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s forgotten sister Nannerl,  performed and written by Sylvia Milo. The play has had several runs in New York and is continuing to be performed around the US and Europe. Her unusual musical interests gained attention when she won the 2007 Concert Artists Guild Competition and awarded the New Music/New Places Fellow.  Since then, she has performed the toy piano in concert halls, museums, public art spaces, theaters and just about anywhere.  In 2016, Phyllis will be premiering a new work for solo toy piano by the Japanese composer, Jo Kondo as well as a new multimedia piece,Snow, composed by John Glover with puppets and film created by Jordan Morley. The piece will be premiered in January 2016 at the Invisible Dog (Brooklyn) at the end of a one-week residency and brought to the Detroit Institute for the Arts for its Midwest premiere in March. Phyllis is one of the founding members of ICE, the International Contemporary Ensemble, based in New York City. The ensemble performed her chamber works for toy piano and small ensemble at the Lincoln Center Mostly Mozart Festival, Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and Atlas Performing Arts Center in DC. ICE will be releasing a joint recording of Phyllis’s chamber works with ICE composer/percussionist Nathan Davis on Starkland Records. Phyllis has released four albums, three solo albums  on such labels as  Concert Artists Guild, cerumenspoon, New Focus Recordings and a fourth collaborative album with Cuddle Magic on fyo records.  Phyllis went to Oberlin Conservatory (BM), Northwestern University (MM) and Indiana University (DMA) and currently resides in Astoria, New York.
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Called “an altogether extraordinary pianist” by Michael Redmond in the Newark Star Ledger, “the Downtown Keyboard Magus” in the New Yorker, and “a witty, genial and adventurous pianist and composer” in the New York Times, Jed Distler has premiered works by Frederic Rzewski, Lois V Vierk, Wendy Mae Chambers, Simeon ten Holt, Richard Rodney Bennett, Alvin Curran, William Schimmel, Virgil Thomson, Andrew Thomas and Virko Baley, among many others. Jed’s principal classical piano teachers were Stanley Lock and William Komaiko, although he considers Dick Hyman, Hank Jones and Bill Evans important mentors in his early years when he played jazz for a living. As a recitalist, Jed has given new music programs across the United States and Europe from Italian festivals in Ravello, Sorrento and Erculano to New York’s Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall. The list of musicians, spoken word performers, visual artists and choreographers with whom Jed has collaborated is a veritable Who’s Who of the New York arts scene in late 20th-century New York. In the 1980s Jed worked closely with dance legend Jacques D’Amboise and, more recently, played Beethoven with the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and has performed with singers as diverse as Phyllis Bryn-Julson and KT Sullivan. In 2012 Jed launched a solo piano project encompassing jazz icon Thelonious Monk’s complete songs in a single concert, and has performed it in New York, Las Vegas, Berkeley, Italy and Germany. Jed conceived and programmed 100 Portraits for Virgil, the first complete performance of all the Virgil Thomson piano portraits in a day long, multi-media festival featuring thirty six performers, co-produced by the New School and Composers Collaborative, the latter for whom he serves as artistic director. He led the New York premier of Simeon ten Holt’s minimalist manifesto Canto Ostinato with four pianos outdoors on Cornelia Street, where he also directed 150 performers for Terry Riley’s “In C” for the first annual Make Music New York festival in 2007. In 2014 Jed and fellow composer/pianist Massimo Giuseppe Bianchi formed a piano duo devoted to old and new music as well as improvisation. The 2017/8 season sees the launch of “Rag-a-Thon,” featuring Jed’s performances of newly commissioned rags from the world’s leading composer/pianists.
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Hailed as “a master pianist” (Andrew Porter, The New Yorker), David Holzman has won acclaim both for his recitals and his recordings. Among his honors and awards have been recording grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Alice B. Ditson Fund and the Aaron Copland Foundation. Commissioning grants have come from such organizations as Reader’s Digest-Meet the Composer and New Jersey Council on the Arts. He has focused much of his attention upon the masterworks of the 20th Century and has been described as “the Horowitz of modern music” (Jerry Kuderna, San Francisco Classical Voice) for his electrifying performances. His debut recording, a CRI LP, was called “one of the great piano discs of the decade” (Peter G. Davis, New York Magazine) and established his reputation as one of the most exciting interpreters of the modern repertoire. His CD, “Stefan Wolpe: Compositions for Piano” on the Bridge label received wide acclaim and won Holzman a Grammy nomination as well as an Indie Award and an ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award for his liner notes. Among several glowing reviews, Christopher Ballanrinp of International Record Review praised the “revelatory insight and passionate conviction” of Holzman’s interpretations and Matthias Kriesberg in The New York Times lauded the “introspective virtuosity” of his pianism. His most recent CD featuring music of Roger Sessions and Ralph Shapey, also on the Bridge label, has received an equally enthusiastic response. Robert Carl (Fanfare Magazine) wrote: “This disc is one that elicits the 'Wow’ response. There are passages where the dense contrapuntal textures are so well differentiated that one might assume this was four-hand music (as an example, the fiery, overflowing explosion ofMutations II has to be heard to be believed).” American Record Guide Magazine put it simply: “It left me breathless.” Performing throughout the world, Mr. Holzman has given lecture-recitals at the Museum of the Diaspora in Jerusalem, the Holocaust Museum in Washington and the African Museum in New Jersey, as well as distinguished Universities throughout America. He has often been featured at festivals such as Darmstadt, Leningrad Spring, the Wolpe Festivals in Toronto, Chicago and New York, the Schoenberg Festival in Vienna, the Alternativa Festival in Moscow and the Festival Internacional De Musica Nueva Siglo XXI in Vera Cruz, Mexico. His performance of the music of Pultizer Prize-winning composer Donald Martino was chosen by the New York Times as one of the highlights of the 1991 season. More recently he performed in the Black Mountain Festival in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Goethe House in New York and Bargemusic in New York. Of this last recital, Steve Smith (The New York Times) wrote: “His account of Elliott Carter’s Sonata was not spotless. But a few missed notes during the work’s most agitated passages were a small price to pay for playing so full of blood, steel, and unshakable conviction”. An active lecturer, Holzman has introduced general audiences to complex and foreign styles. Most recently, his lecture on Ralph Shapey’s 21 Variations can be heard on the Art of the States Exploded View #2 (www.artofthestates.org). His writings, covering all areas of music, appear in such periodicals as Sonus, Contemporary Music Review, New Music Connossieur as well as Pendragon Press. Born in New York in 1949, Holzman received his BM magna cum laude from Mannes College of Music. He completed his studies with Nadia Reisenberg at Queens College. He was a finalist in the Carnegie Hall American Music Competition and the International Keyboard Competition of St. Germaine-en-Laye. David Holzman is currently Professor of Piano at the C.W.Post Campus of Long Island University.
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Described as “brilliant and searching…beautiful and impassioned…lustrous at the keyboard” by The New York Times, Lisa Moore’s performances combine music and theatre with expressive and emotional power - whether in the delivery of the simplest song, a solo recital or a fiendish chamber score. Pitchfork writes “She’s the best kind of contemporary classical musician, one so fearsomely game that she inspires composers to offer her their most wildly unplayable ideas”. Lisa Moore has released 8 solo discs (Cantaloupe Music, Orange Mountain Music and Tall Poppies) and over 30 collaborative discs (Sony, Nonesuch, DG, CRI, BMG, Point, New World, ABC Classics, Albany, New Albion, Starkland and Harmonia Mundi). Her 9th solo disc is due out in the 2015-16 season (on Cantaloupe) featuring works by Martin Bresnick, John Luther Adams, Missy Mazzoli, Kate Moore and Julia Wolfe. Crowned “New York’s queen of avant-garde piano” and “visionary” in The New Yorker this Australian virtuoso has performed with a large and diverse range of musicians and artists throughout the globe – the London Sinfonietta, New York City Ballet, Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Bargemusic, Bang on a Can All-Stars, TwoSense, Steve Reich Ensemble, Paul Dresher Double Duo, Grand Band, ExhAust, Howl, So Percussion, Don Byron Adventurers Orchestra, Ensemble Signal, Le Train Bleu, Third Coast Percussion, Da Capo Chamber Players, Eighth Blackbird, American Composers Orchestra, Mabou Mines Theater, Eliot Feld, Susan Marshall Dance, Sequitur, Music at the Anthology, St. Lukes Orchestra, Australia Ensemble, Westchester Philharmonic, New York League of Composers ISCM, Alpha Centauri Ensemble, Terra Australis and the John Jasperse Dance Company. Lisa Moore is a Steinway artist. She has performed in some of the world’s greatest concert halls - La Scala, the Musikverein, the Sydney Opera House, Carnegie Hall and the Royal Albert Hall - to name just a few. Her guest appearances at festivals include the Holland, Lincoln Center, Schleswig-Holstein, BBC Proms, Israel, Warsaw, Uzbekistan, Musica Ficta Lithuania, Prague Spring, Istanbul, Athens, Taormina, Southbank’s Meltdown, Dublin’s Crash, Graz, Huddersfield, Scotia, Paris d'Automne, Shanghai, Beijing, Hong Kong, Turin, Palermo, Barcelona, Heidelberg, Berlin, Perugia, Tanglewood, Mendocino, FENAM Sacramento, Arts and Ideas New Haven, Sundance Institute, Houston Da Camera, Jacob’s Pillow, Aspen, Norfolk, Sandpoint, Saratoga, Victoriaville, Ojai, Other Minds, Sonic Boom, BAM Next Wave, Ecstatic Music, Bang on a Can, Keys to the Future, Kettlecorn, MassMoca, Healing The Divide, Mizzou, Music 10 Blonay, Adelaide, Perth, Queensland, Canberra, Sydney, Sydney’s Olympic Arts, Sydney Spring, Sydney Mostly Mozart, Sydney Big Ideas, Brisbane Biennale, Melbourne’s Metropolis and the Darwin Festival. Having won the silver medal in the 1981 Rockefeller-Carnegie Hall International American Music Competition Lisa Moore moved to New York in 1985 to begin free-lancing. From 1992-2008 she was the founding pianist for the Bang On A Can All-Stars - the New York based electro-acoustic sextet and winner of Musical America’s 2005 Ensemble of the Year Award. Passionately dedicated to the music of our time as well as the great musical canon she has collaborated with hundreds of composers - folks such as John Adams, Martin Bresnick, Gerard Brophy, Elliot Carter, Ornette Coleman, Phillip Glass, Elena Kats-Chernin, Hannah Lash, David Lang, Kate Moore, Thurston Moore, Meredith Monk, Steve Reich, Frederic Rzewski, Michael Smetanin, Julia Wolfe and Iannis Xenakis. As a concerto soloist Moore has performed with the London Sinfonietta, Australian Chamber Orchestra, Wesleyan Orchestra and Sumarsam Gamelan, Albany, Sydney, Tasmania, Thai and Canberra Symphony Orchestras, Philharmonia Virtuosi and the Queensland Philharmonic - under the batons of Bradley Lubman, Richard Mills, Reinbert de Leeuw, Pierre Boulez, Jorge Mester, Angel Gil-Ordonez and Edo de Waart. As an artistic curator Moore produced Australia’s Canberra International Music Festival 2008 Sounds Alive series, importing artists from around the world for 10 days of events at the Street Theatre. New projects inspire the searching nature of Lisa Moore’s creativity. Recent excursions include Grand Band - a piano sextet featuring some of the finest pianists in NYC and TwoSense - a commissioning cello (Ashley Bathgate) and piano duo dedicated to expanding the chamber music repertoire. Apart from teaching piano at Wesleyan University and coaching at the Yale-Norfolk Festival New Music Workshop (where she occasionally conducts) Lisa Moore makes regular guest teaching appearances at conservatories around the world. Past residencies include London’s Royal Academy of Music, Eastman School of Music, Sydney and Queensland Conservatoriums, Australian Youth Orchestra National Music Camp and the Australian National Academy of Music. She was born in Canberra and raised in Australia and London (1971-73). Lisa studied at the Sydney (NSW) Conservatorium for 4 years from 1976-80 before moving to the USA. She spent a year in Paris (1982-83) before settling in New York City. She is a graduate of the University of Illinois (BMus) Eastman School of Music (MMus) and SUNY Stonybrook (DMA). Her past teachers include Gilbert Kalish, David Burge, Yvonne Loriod, Albert Landa, Sonya Hanke, Wilma McKeown and Larry Sitsky. Lisa Moore periodically hosts New York Public Radio’s WQXR Q2 show “Hammered!”
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