Sounding Beckett

Sounding Beckett

www.soundingbeckett.com

Sounding Beckett Press & Reviews

 

“Sounding Beckett” is directed by Joy Zinoman, the founding artistic director of the Studio Theater in Washington (she stepped down in 2010), who chose the plays and has staged them with a glamorous starkness and a clear respect for the works’ purity. They alternate with original musical compositions that they inspired, performed live and with a haunting intensity by the Cygnus Ensemble.---Anita Gates, New York Times

----NY Times Arts Briefly, Monday, July 23

----NY Times Overview

---NY Times review by Anita Gates

---Washington Post review by Peter Marks

---Time Out New York

---National Public Radio's All Things Considered

---Chamber Musician Today review by Christian Carey

---Backstage

---Theatermania review by Dan Bacalzo

---Sequenza21 review by Christian Carey

Thanks so much to the whole team! 

Joy Zinoman, Director; Tara Helen O'Connor, flute; Holly Twyfor, actress;  John Halle, composer; James Austin Smith, oboe;  Oren Fader, guitar;  Scott Johnson, composer, Phillip Goodwin, actor;  Solomon HaileSelassie, Stage Manager; Laura Schwendinger and Laura Kaminsky, composers; Pauline Kim Harris, violin;  Ted van Griethuysen, actor;  Chris Gross, cello;  David Glaser & Chester Biscardi, composers;  Sam Rudy, Publicist;  Marc Wolf, webmaster;  Alanna Maharajh Stone, Associate Producer;  Jeremy Tressler, sound designer;  Helen Huang, costumes;  Debra Booth, set designer;  Michael Gianitti, lighting designer;  Lucianna Stecconi, designer;  Derek Cook, Technical Director;  Marilyn Morseldine, graphic artist.

The NPR piece by Jeff Lunden really nailed the show, clarified in a 5-minute discussion that was aired on All Things Considered on Tuesday, September 17---with short, Beckett plays alternating with music that was composed as responses to the plays, my hope was that the authentic Beckett audience might prove to be open to new music.  I hoped to create an evening where pure instrumental music and the purest theater-in-a black-void would complement one another.  

Several bloggers really hated the idea.

In the end, it was a tribute to ambitious degrees of abstraction, a modernist lovefest, with postmodernists welcome....